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Respondent types

Evidence can be collected about any investment or activity that has an impact on individuals and delivers outcomes for the community. Surveying a mix of stakeholders at different stages of a program can help to show broad impact. The system has a three-pronged approach in which the opinions of self-assessors, peer assessors and the public can be compared to generate significant learnings. Culture Counts support staff can help organisations to plan best-practice evaluations, including determining respondent groups, understanding sample sizes and choosing distribution methods.

Public respondents

Public respondents are members of the public from which you wish to gain feedback about your activity. Public respondents will always be evaluated via Standard surveys (See Survey Types), generally during or after an activity. You should aim to get enough public responses to reflect a significant sample of your total audience.

Peer assessors

Peer assessors are respondents who possess expert industry knowledge in relation to your activity. We recommend asking at least four peers to assess your event. This will allow for any last-minute cancellations, helps to balance individual opinions and gives you a more comprehensive expert assessment of your work. If you can, we recommend asking peer assessors to complete both a Prior and Post survey (see Survey Types).

Note: If you only obtain one peer response, it is important to account for this when drawing insights from the results, noting that the results are the opinion of one person rather than a group of people.

Self assessors

Self assessors refer to any person or staff member who has contributed to or worked on producing the activity being evaluated. Self assessors can be just one person or a range of key personnel from your organisation that are involved in the event (such as artists, creative directors, managers or board members). If you can, we recommend asking self assessors to complete both a Prior and Post survey (see Survey Types).

Note: If you only obtain one self-response, it is important to account for this when drawing insights from the results, noting that the results are the opinion of one person rather than a group of people.

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